​Steve Travis
Meteorologist

While I don’t own a stethoscope or analyze medical charts on a day-to-day basis, I still have a role in saving lives. I am responsible for the safety and health of my community’s people, businesses and properties.

As a meteorologist I interpret, observe and predict the weather. Each day, I gather and analyze data from world-wide stations, satellites, radars and remote sensors and then craft a weather report and forecast. It is my job to identify hazardous weather conditions, and then notify and prepare the public in advance.

While I often advise our audiences to avoid the roads and seek shelter during extreme weather conditions, my job prohibits me from taking my own advice. People need to be aware of the weather at all times of the day, which includes early mornings, late nights, weekends, holidays or sometimes right in the middle of a storm. To provide up-to-the-minute updates, I often have to travel to the office through blinding snow, rain or fog. Living in a small town, like I do, also requires commuting on narrow, pitch-dark roads as well as through blinding snow, rain or fog. Living in a small town, like I do, also requires commuting on narrow, pitch-dark roads as well.

Having a well-functioning set of headlights is imperative to performing my job, especially when my day starts as early as 4 a.m. or ends as late as 2 a.m. I’m usually always traveling in the dark so having good lighting visibility is vital. I actually replaced my last vehicle because the lighting was so poor. It was an older model that over time developed a film over the cover of my headlights, causing the lights to appear foggy and weak. This made my commute even more challenging, especially on days where I had to travel through a storm or dense fog. The headlights on my new vehicle provide a wider range of vision and, since I’m able to see more of the road ahead of me, I worry less about getting to and from work and can stay focused on my job.